Turkey: TAT food company to expand in Europe

Do not underestimate tomatoes.

A book called “The Empire of the Red Gold” (“L’Empire de l’or rouge” in French) was strongly recommended to holidaymakers in France a few months ago. It’s about tomatoes.

French journalist Jean-Baptiste Mallet pursued tomatoes for two-and-a-half-years, and traveled around the world from China to Italy, from California to Africa.

Mallet examines the “tomato industry” by starting with an old tomato processing factory in France bought by the Chinese army. He reveals the “unethical” businesses done by the Chinese and Italians in this $10-billion industry.

I still had “The Empire of the Red Gold in the back of my mind” when I was going to the 50th anniversary of Tat, a Turkish food company especially famous for its processed tomato products, with Tat’s director-general, Arzu Aslan Kesimer.

The adventure of Tat began when late entrepreneur Vehbi Koç took an interest in tomato production in Portugal and Spain. By sending three agricultural engineers to Portugal, Koç began researching about tomatoes years before the construction of the Tat factory in the district of Mustafakemalpaşa in the western province of Bursa.

Turkey holds fifth place in tomato production

We loved the tomatoes brought to Europe by the Spanish after the discovery of America. We hold fifth place in tomato production – following the United States, China, Italy and Spain respectively – and the sixth place in tomato export.

Founded with Koç’s vision, Tat has produced 2 billion cans of tomato paste and 500 million bottles of ketchup in its three factories. In 2016, 65,000 cans/jars of tomato products have hit the shelves under the brand of Tat.

In southern Europe, which has features similar to our lands, productivity is higher. While our farmers can produce seven tons of tomatoes, the U.S. and southern European countries produce 10 and 12 tons of tomatoes respectively, on the same amount of land. Therefore, Tat trains its 650 contract laborers, 50 of whom are women, with its own agriculture team.

Tat has also established a partnership with Japan’s long-established company Kagome. “The partnership with the Japanese is helping us develop the quality [of our products] thanks to the support of technology,” said its director-general.

Time for investment

Tat has a turnover of 380 million Turkish Liras from tomato products, of which 10 percent is constituted of exports. Japan is the biggest importer of Tat products. Exporting the most to the Middle East after Japan, Tat has also been growing in Europe in the last years.

“It is possible to find Tat products in 3,400 locations, including important grocery store chains in Europe,” said Kesimer.

“This year, Tat, which not only produces tomato products but also pasta and dairy products, will attain the turnover of 1 billion liras. We are open to all kinds of investments. Yet most importantly, we want to invest abroad in the tomato industry,” she gave the good news.

“We are looking at Portugal, Spain, and Italy – in short, southern Europe – for investments, just as Koç did 50 years ago. We are closely following the U.S. and China as well, but we are currently focusing on Europe.

Let me return to “The Empire of the Red Gold” before concluding. In the book, Mallet explains how China uses child labor in its tomato fields and, after some unpleasant processes, the products are reportedly distributed by the Italian mafia.

Turkey’s tomato industry has never become entangled in such claims. I would say that it is time for Turkey to step up in Europe with Tat.

DailyNews, September 19, 2017

Nigeria: brand new factory closed for lack of fresh tomatoes

KANO, Nigeria – At a state-of-the-art plant in northern Nigeria, shiny machines stand next to a conveyor belt ready to crush tomatoes to satisfy the country’s insatiable demand for tomato paste.

But a lonely cleaner mopping the floor is the only sign of activity in Nigeria’s biggest tomato factory, equipped with the latest Italian and German technology. There aren’t enough tomatoes to run it.

It’s a powerful symbol of Nigeria’s uphill challenge to build up agricultural production and end costly food imports to feed its 190 million people. The West African nation imports staples from milk to wheat to tomato paste, with funds it mainly earns from exporting oil.

The conglomerate of Africa’s richest man, Aliko Dangote, launched the plant in March 2016, contracting Italian engineers working for months on a 350 euro-a-day allowances to set up the machines outside Kano, the main city in the north.

On paper this looked like a smart move as Nigeria imports up to 400,000 tons of tomato paste annually. The tinned paste is an ingredient in Nigerian tomato stew, used as the base for a host of traditional meat stews, sauces, soups and rice dishes that are staples of Nigerian cooking.

Dangote Group had thought of every technical detail, even setting up a control room linking its engineers to experts in Italy in case there was a problem.

But it underestimated the difficulties involved in getting tomatoes, despite signing deals with some 5,000 farmers guaranteeing them to pay more than the market price.

Lacking fertilizers and working with their bare hands, the farmers have been unable to produce the quality and quantity the plant needs to make paste. Much of the last season’s output was wiped out by a pest.

The plant has been so far unable to find other supplies despite Nigeria producing some 1.5 million tons of tomatoes annually. A lack of good roads due to decades of corruption means tomatoes would perish on the way. Half of the country’s output gets wasted.

Bar a few weeks, the plant has been standing idle, said its frustrated manager said A.L. Kaito, the managing director of Dangote Farms in charge of the plant.

« We are trying to weather out the storm, the cost is horrendous, » said Kaito. « It’s a nightmare. »

Dangote spent some 4 billion naira ($12.74 million) on the plant and now plans to set up its own tomato cultivation scheme for around ten billion naira to cover up to 70 percent of its needs, buying land and tractors. Experts from Israel, Mexico and Spain will be flown in.

PROBLEMS

The tomato plant hopes to restart work in January at just half of its capacity of 1,200 tons a day after the next season, in the meantime costing 5 million naira every month.

Dangote has kept workers sitting at home on the payroll: the Italians spent months training them on the new machines.

The investment is paltry for its owner, who is spending billions of dollars on cement plants, sugar and rice schemes across Africa. His cement business alone posted revenues worth in 615 billion naira in 2016.

But for President Muhammadu Buhari the idle plant is a major setback after another tomato factory in Lagos threw in the towel in November 2016, unable to import tomatoes due to a lack of hard currency as Nigeria struggles with recession.

Buhari had, since his election in 2015, made it a priority to end dependency on food under the motto: « We must produce what we eat. »

To encourage agriculture investments like the Dangote plant, the government has waived duties for greenhouse and processing equipment.

It is also giving subsidies to rice farmers and is considering expanding the scheme to tomato growers, a senior official in the federal ministry of agriculture said.

Officials had hoped to create jobs in agriculture to fight poverty in the north where some unemployed young men have joined an eight-year insurgency by Boko Haram jihadists.

But experts and farmers say, after decades of corruption holding back road and electricity projects and an obsession with producing oil, it will take time to improve the tomato output.

Low quality seed and a lack of power for pumping water means tomatoes can be grown only during the dry season, which creates a glut in March.

Farmers then lay out their tomatoes alongside highways hoping motorists will buy them. Anything that does not get sold within 24 hours is usually wasted due to a lack of cold storage.

They also ship some to Lagos, the southern megacity 1,000 km (600 miles) south of the factory. A basket of tomatoes sells for 2,000 naira in Lagos, but only around 10 percent of that ends up in farmers’ pockets as traders and truckers take their cut.

« We don’t have fertilizers and there is no power for cold rooms, » said Sani Yadakwari, chairman of the some 10,000 tomato farmers in Kano state. « We need subsidies for our production. »

Dangote has been supplying farmers with a Dutch seed which is expected to gradually boost the yield to 50 tons of tomatoes a hectare from 10 to 15 tons now, said Kaito.

But Adamu Sani, an agronomist working for the World Bank, was skeptical production would rise soon as farmers needed to get trained to use the new seeds which had not been tested yet on a large scale in Nigeria.

Dangote calls the plant the biggest in Africa. But the size might be a disadvantage: « The minimum capacity of the Dangote plant is too high for the little volumes you can get from farmers, » Sani said.

Reuters-September 18, 2017

USA Del Monte Foods: tomato processing plant closing down, shifting production to Hanford

Del Monte Foods plans to close a northern Indiana tomato processing plant with about 100 workers and shift its production to a central California facility.

The company announced Tuesday it would start layoffs in November as it ceases production at the Plymouth, Indiana, plant that makes ketchup, tomato-based sauces, and juice from concentrate. Warehouse and distribution work is expected to end by February, when the facility will close.

Del Monte says in a state filing that it expects the closing will be permanent.

The company says the closing will align its production capacity with current consumer demand. Production will be shifted to a plant in Hanford, California.

Bay Valley Foods said last month it would be closing its Plymouth facilities, eliminating about 150 jobs.

September 13, 2017

Italy to extend country of origin labelling to tomato products

Italy’s decision to impose mandatory labelling on pasta and rice packaging has triggered protests from the food industry, which has called on the European Commission to cancel the measure.

The Italian ministry of agriculture declared its intention on September 4th, to include the origin of primary ingredients on the labels of tomato-based products, drawing criticism from the European food and drink industry for “undermining the EU single market for food”.

“We are working with Minister [of Economic Development Carlo] Calenda to extend to tomato products the duty to specify the origin of primary ingredients, like we have done for milk, pasta and rice […] We are advancing the protection of the ‘made in Italy’ brand, and the valorization of our farmers’ work,” Minister of Agriculture Maurizio Martina told the Italian press.

The initiative comes after the merger of two large tomato exporters – Pomi (known abroad as the Pomito brand) and De Rica – in a move to counter foreign competition.

Martina welcomed the merger: “We are going ahead with our commitment in light of the important merger of Pomi and De Rica. This experience can strengthen and enhance this quality food export in the world,” he said.

The announcement comes only weeks after Italy passed new legislation to demand that the origin of durum wheat and rice are indicated on the label, starting from February 2018.

Challenging European labelling rules

Italy’s move anticipates European regulation on food information to consumers, which demands that where the origin of a food is given and is not the same as that of its primary ingredient, the origin of this ingredient must also be given or indicated as being different to that of the food.

The regulation seeks to change current rules, under which a processed product marketed as “made in Italy” can contain imported ingredients without the need to tell the consumer.

Under new rules, to be implemented in the second half of 2017, any can of plum tomatoes packaged in Italy will have to specify if the tomatoes themselves are produced in Italy or elsewhere.

But Italy chose to go ahead with legislation without waiting for Brussels, which, according to Martina, “chose not to proceed in a timely manner with the full implementation of the labelling regulation”.

A Commission spokesperson said that the executive was not notified by Italy about the pasta and rice legislation, and is “in the process of gathering the relevant information and facts from the Italian authorities regarding the adoption of the national legislation concerned. The European Commission doesn’t have enough information at this stage to comment on the decrees”.

“Undermining the single market”

FoodDrinkEurope, a body representing the European food and drink industry, reacted negatively to Italy’s initiative, saying that it undermines the EU’s single market. It has also prompted the European Commission to “take immediate action” against it.

A FoodDrinkEurope spokesperson said: “If confirmed, this national unilateral initiative is yet another step towards the further fragmentation of the EU Single Market for foods, one of the core foundations of the European Union. The situation is no longer tenable for producers who are facing ever more additional burdens and barriers to trade.”

Italy ignored the rules once again with tomatoes, in a move to counter rising foreign imports undermining Italian producers.

Imports of Chinese tomato puree increased by 43% in 2016, according to Italian farmers’ union Coldiretti.

Italy, the US and China account for 60% of the world’s processed tomatoes production. But China’s share in the market of processed tomatoes has been growing and is predicted to overcome Italy in 2017 and become the second largest producer after the US, according to an industry-wide report.

Coldiretti described the initiative as “positive”, and voiced hope it would be extended to all horticultural products.

“From concentrated fruit juice to packed salads, and vegetables used in canned soups, there is no origin on the package, and this drives important quantities of imports. The consumer should decide on the basis of labelling information whether the price is worth the quality,” Lorenzo Bazzana, the economic director of Coldiretti, told EURACTIV.com.

Coldiretti is a member of Copa and Cogeca, the EU farmers’ body, whose Secretary-General Pekka Pesonen said :

“The main goal of food labelling is to help consumers make informed choices and avoid misleading practices. That is why, if consumers are to be informed about the origin of an agricultural product, it will reflect the so-called ‘place of farming’. Of course, any new initiative will also need to ensure that the internal market functions properly.”

Euractiv, Sept 6, 2017

California Crop – updated September 10, 2017

   
PROJECTIONS
Week Ending
09/09/2017
16/09/2017
Weekly Deliveries
849 000
7 643 238
Projected Accumulated
857 000
8 500 238

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
ENDING
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                                
10-Jun    
   
17-Jun                        
24-Jun    
4 903
4 903
   
12 120
12 120
               
1-Jul    
49 532
54 435
121 323
121 323
168 320
180 440
177 613
177 613
17 549
17 549
       
8-Jul
28 711
28 711
351 904
406 339
619 964
741 287
535 753
716 184
529 841
707 452
296 462
314 011
70 742
70 742
57 489
57 489
15-Jul
343 310
372 020
644 445
1 050 788
972 541
1 713 828
888 027
1 604 214
670 493
1 379 282
648 196
962 219
402 371
473 093
392 212
449 701
22-Jul
660 064
1 032 105
889 281
1 940 069
1 062 335
2 776 139
1 054 791
2 659 007
742 707
2 129 989
871 966
1 834 194
609 235
1 065 526
799 901
1 249 602
29-Jul
844 215
1 876 319
1 015 702
2 955 769
1 181 755
3 957 918
1 113 593
3 772 600
923 466
3 045 455
1 042 312
2 876 521
852 035
1 917 561
1 033 639
2 283 241
5-Aug
994 444
2 870 764
1 136 656
4 092 425
1 189 474
5 147 392
1 073 342
4 845 949
1 013 951
4 059 429
1 048 101
3 924 701
1 021 136
2 938 696
1 042 726
3 325 967
12-Aug
1 033 263
3 904 025
1 170 944
5 263 369
1 192 171
6 339 564
1 021 386
5 867 335
1 015 055
5 074 488
1 066 806
4 991 510
1 108 629
4 047 325
1 088 300
4 414 267
19-Aug
1 051 151
4 955 175
1 116 192
6 379 561
1 132 485
7 472 064
1 056 380
6 923 714
1 016 690
6 091 179
1 091 377
6 082 274
1 106 895
5 154 221
1 108 317
5 522 584
26-Aug
961 254
5 916 454
1 075 915
7 455 500
1 122 439
8 594 503
1 034 983
7 958 697
1 006 748
7 097 926
1 088 708
7 164 708
1 060 795
6 215 016
1 073 161
6 595 745
2-Sep
877 783
6 794 238
1 058 897
8 514 419
1 110 616
9 705 119
1 083 455
9 042 166
920 144
8 018 089
1 050 642
8 214 846
1 066 536
7 281 552
1 049 516
7 645 261
9-Sep
1 054 684
9 569 155
1 122 282
10 827 430
1 089 314
10 131 314
902 046
8 920 141
1 045 457
9 260 303
1 051 587
8 333 140
1 070 823
8 716 084
16-Sep
997 332
10 566 487
1 044 457
11 871 877
1 039 710
11 171 184
860 511
9 780 678
975 964
10 236 267
1 013 134
9 346 248
1 025 139
9 741 223
23-Sep
904 116
11 470 604
972 770
12 844 646
912 924
12 084 108
838 108
10 618 786
963 448
11 199 715
1 031 951
10 378 390
1 012 226
10 753 449
30-Sep
706 152
12 176 777
727 106
13 571 752
806 506
12 890 614
773 281
11 392 067
801 102
12 000 861
586 838
10 965 187
826 441
11 579 890
7-Oct
322 539
12 499 335
468 012
14 039 764
641 117
13 531 732
473 079
11 865 559
496 614
12 497 475
590 875
11 556 095
591 942
12 171 832
14-Oct
-
-
-
-
334 898
13 866 630
—-
—-
130 465
12 627 940
384 613
11 940 708
12 171 832
21-Oct
-
-
-
-
126 470
13 993 100
247 458
12 113 017
       
12 171 832
28-Oct
147 644
12 646 979
321 424
14 361 188
16 881
14 009 982
124 879
12 297 000

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board

PROJECTIONS for ORGANIC TOMATOES

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
ENDING    
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                    
1-Jul     31 967 31 967 6 702 6 702 584 584 11 061 11 061
8-Jul
6 338
6 338
50 685 82 652 22 633 29 335 32 877 33 461 32 263 43 324
15-Jul
51 743
58 081
86 668 169 320 76 567 105 902 78 860 112 321 44 421 87 745
22-Jul
116 363
174 444
95 130 264 450 66 845 172 747 70 236 182 557 23 371 111 116
29-Jul
72 916
247 360
80 646 345 096 30 758 203 505 18 016 200 573 19 054 130 170
5-Aug
27 543
274 903
44 216 389 312 36 634 240 139 21 963 222 536 24 500 154 670
12-Aug
20 200
295 103
36 397 425 709 32 689 272 828 26 257 248 793 22 065 176 735
19-Aug
26 777
321 880
30 663 456 372 45 749 318 577 34 326 283 119 16 897 193 632
26-Aug
23 228
345 108
36 508 492 880 45 523 364 100 42 800 325 919 27 051 220 683
2-Sep
17 335
362 443
56 650 549 530 30 237 394 337 14 989 340 908 34 243 254 926
9-Sep
53 083 602 613 21 751 416 088 17 369 358 277 17 830 272 756
16-Sep
44 710 647 323 19 769 435 857 11 231 369 508 7 867 280 623
23-Sep
40 650 687 973 12 922 448 779 1 218 370 726 5 121 285 744
30-Sep
36 828 724 801 8 970 457 749     336 286 080
7-Oct
    5 225 462 974        
14-Oct
    6 657 469 631        
21-Oct
    233 469 864        
28-Oct
               

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board

 

 

TOMATOLAND WORLD PRICE INDEX – AUGUST 2017

 



Products for the industry – NEW CROP 2017

Price per Kg, packed in aseptic bag in 220 l. (55 gal) drum – unless otherwise specified


Origin
28/30CB

28/30HB*
36/38CB
12/14HB
Diced
Crushed

Italy

€ 0.690

€ 0.700

€ 0.880

€ 0.390

€ 0.350

€ 0.330

Spain

€ 0.670

€ 0.690

€ 0.840

€ 0.370

€ 0.330

€ 0.310

Portugal

€ 0.660

€ 0.680

€ 0.830

€ 0.360

€ 0.330

no offer

France

€ 0.700

no offer

no offer

€ 0.400

€ 0.360

no offer

Greece

€ 0.690

no offer

€ 0.850

no offer

€ 0.360

no offer

China**

no offer

€ 0.606
($ 0.710)

€ 0.650
($ 0.760)

no offer

no offer   

no offer

Turkey

no offer

€ 0.683
($ 0.800)

€ 0.820
($ 0.960)

no offer

no offer

no offer

Egypt

(low color)

no offer

no offer

€ 0.710
($ 0.830)

no offer

no offer

no offer

USA

no offer

€ 0.665
($ 0.780)

€0.750
($0.880)

no offer

no offer

no offer

Chile

no offer

no offer

€0.770
($0.900)

no offer

no offer

no offer


* 30/32HB for USA and Chile.

** Offers may not include crop to crop shipments.

Prices are converted at 1.17 US $ / € (1.13 in our previous WPI).

Prices are for crop to crop shipments and new packaging.

Prices are Ex-factory execpt for Turkey, Chile and China (FOB Izmir, Valparaiso and Tianjin).

For USA, prices on FAS Oakland basis – in wooden bins. Discounts may apply if bins are returned. Drums approximately $ 100 /MT higher.

Actual prices can vary depending on quality requirements, packaging type, delivery period and payment conditions.

Back to home page

Tomatoland Staff

 

 

 

Univer’s Tomato Processing Plant in Hungary

Univer Product Plc. has begun the 2017 tomato processing season in one of the largest, state-of-the-art plants of Central Europe. The investment project was started in 2016 and completed for the 2017 season, right on time for the first deliveries of tomatoes arriving for processing.
Univer will be increasing the plant’s output continuously on a step by step basis from 80,000 tonnes in order to reach an annual processing volume of 140,000 tonnes of raw tomatoes. Owing to the latest cutting edge technology provided by Catelli Food Technology, it is not just quantity that is reaching new heights, but quality, as well. Univer Product Plc can supply its partners with the highest possible quality tomato paste, including 28/30 Cold Break and Hot Break, as well as 36/38 Cold Break types.
In addition to increasing volumes, contracted farmers have also boosted their production capacities, and Univer is proud to say that we will continue to process exclusively Hungarian tomatoes at the plant.
The 2017 season has already begun, and thanks to the proper circumstances, everything is going according to plan.

Visit us at: www.hungariantomato.com

August 25th, 2017

California Crop – updated August 23, 2017

   
PROJECTIONS
Week Ending
19/08/2017
26/08/2017
Weekly Deliveries
1 068 000
1 060 000
Projected Accumulated
4 972 025
6 032 025

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
ENDING
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                                
10-Jun    
   
17-Jun                        
24-Jun    
4 903
4 903
   
12 120
12 120
               
1-Jul    
49 532
54 435
121 323
121 323
168 320
180 440
177 613
177 613
17 549
17 549
       
8-Jul
28 711
28 711
351 904
406 339
619 964
741 287
535 753
716 184
529 841
707 452
296 462
314 011
70 742
70 742
57 489
57 489
15-Jul
343 310
372 020
644 445
1 050 788
972 541
1 713 828
888 027
1 604 214
670 493
1 379 282
648 196
962 219
402 371
473 093
392 212
449 701
22-Jul
660 064
1 032 105
889 281
1 940 069
1 062 335
2 776 139
1 054 791
2 659 007
742 707
2 129 989
871 966
1 834 194
609 235
1 065 526
799 901
1 249 602
29-Jul
844 215
1 876 319
1 015 702
2 955 769
1 181 755
3 957 918
1 113 593
3 772 600
923 466
3 045 455
1 042 312
2 876 521
852 035
1 917 561
1 033 639
2 283 241
5-Aug
994 444
2 870 764
1 136 656
4 092 425
1 189 474
5 147 392
1 073 342
4 845 949
1 013 951
4 059 429
1 048 101
3 924 701
1 021 136
2 938 696
1 042 726
3 325 967
12-Aug
1 033 263
3 904 025
1 170 944
5 263 369
1 192 171
6 339 564
1 021 386
5 867 335
1 015 055
5 074 488
1 066 806
4 991 510
1 108 629
4 047 325
1 088 300
4 414 267
19-Aug
1 116 192
6 379 561
1 132 485
7 472 064
1 056 380
6 923 714
1 016 690
6 091 179
1 091 377
6 082 274
1 106 895
5 154 221
1 108 317
5 522 584
26-Aug
1 075 915
7 455 500
1 122 439
8 594 503
1 034 983
7 958 697
1 006 748
7 097 926
1 088 708
7 164 708
1 060 795
6 215 016
1 073 161
6 595 745
2-Sep
1 058 897
8 514 419
1 110 616
9 705 119
1 083 455
9 042 166
920 144
8 018 089
1 050 642
8 214 846
1 066 536
7 281 552
1 049 516
7 645 261
9-Sep
1 054 684
9 569 155
1 122 282
10 827 430
1 089 314
10 131 314
902 046
8 920 141
1 045 457
9 260 303
1 051 587
8 333 140
1 070 823
8 716 084
16-Sep
997 332
10 566 487
1 044 457
11 871 877
1 039 710
11 171 184
860 511
9 780 678
975 964
10 236 267
1 013 134
9 346 248
1 025 139
9 741 223
23-Sep
904 116
11 470 604
972 770
12 844 646
912 924
12 084 108
838 108
10 618 786
963 448
11 199 715
1 031 951
10 378 390
1 012 226
10 753 449
30-Sep
706 152
12 176 777
727 106
13 571 752
806 506
12 890 614
773 281
11 392 067
801 102
12 000 861
586 838
10 965 187
826 441
11 579 890
7-Oct
322 539
12 499 335
468 012
14 039 764
641 117
13 531 732
473 079
11 865 559
496 614
12 497 475
590 875
11 556 095
591 942
12 171 832
14-Oct
-
-
-
-
334 898
13 866 630
—-
—-
130 465
12 627 940
384 613
11 940 708
12 171 832
21-Oct
-
-
-
-
126 470
13 993 100
247 458
12 113 017
       
12 171 832
28-Oct
147 644
12 646 979
321 424
14 361 188
16 881
14 009 982
124 879
12 297 000

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board

PROJECTIONS for ORGANIC TOMATOES

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
ENDING    
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                    
1-Jul     31 967 31 967 6 702 6 702 584 584 11 061 11 061
8-Jul
6 338
6 338
50 685 82 652 22 633 29 335 32 877 33 461 32 263 43 324
15-Jul
51 743
58 081
86 668 169 320 76 567 105 902 78 860 112 321 44 421 87 745
22-Jul
116 363
174 444
95 130 264 450 66 845 172 747 70 236 182 557 23 371 111 116
29-Jul
72 916
247 360
80 646 345 096 30 758 203 505 18 016 200 573 19 054 130 170
5-Aug
27 543
274 903
44 216 389 312 36 634 240 139 21 963 222 536 24 500 154 670
12-Aug
20 200
295 103
36 397 425 709 32 689 272 828 26 257 248 793 22 065 176 735
19-Aug
30 663 456 372 45 749 318 577 34 326 283 119 16 897 193 632
26-Aug
36 508 492 880 45 523 364 100 42 800 325 919 27 051 220 683
2-Sep
56 650 549 530 30 237 394 337 14 989 340 908 34 243 254 926
9-Sep
53 083 602 613 21 751 416 088 17 369 358 277 17 830 272 756
16-Sep
44 710 647 323 19 769 435 857 11 231 369 508 7 867 280 623
23-Sep
40 650 687 973 12 922 448 779 1 218 370 726 5 121 285 744
30-Sep
36 828 724 801 8 970 457 749     336 286 080
7-Oct
    5 225 462 974        
14-Oct
    6 657 469 631        
21-Oct
    233 469 864        
28-Oct
               

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board

 

 

California Crop – updated July 31, 2017

   
PROJECTIONS
Week Ending
22/07/2017
29/07/2017
Weekly Deliveries
660 000
868 000
Projected Accumulated
1 032 020
1 900 020

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
ENDING
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                                
10-Jun    
   
17-Jun                        
24-Jun    
4 903
4 903
   
12 120
12 120
               
1-Jul    
49 532
54 435
121 323
121 323
168 320
180 440
177 613
177 613
17 549
17 549
       
8-Jul
28 711
28 711
351 904
406 339
619 964
741 287
535 753
716 184
529 841
707 452
296 462
314 011
70 742
70 742
57 489
57 489
15-Jul
343 310
372 020
644 445
1 050 788
972 541
1 713 828
888 027
1 604 214
670 493
1 379 282
648 196
962 219
402 371
473 093
392 212
449 701
22-Jul
889 281
1 940 069
1 062 335
2 776 139
1 054 791
2 659 007
742 707
2 129 989
871 966
1 834 194
609 235
1 065 526
799 901
1 249 602
29-Jul
1 015 702
2 955 769
1 181 755
3 957 918
1 113 593
3 772 600
923 466
3 045 455
1 042 312
2 876 521
852 035
1 917 561
1 033 639
2 283 241
5-Aug
1 136 656
4 092 425
1 189 474
5 147 392
1 073 342
4 845 949
1 013 951
4 059 429
1 048 101
3 924 701
1 021 136
2 938 696
1 042 726
3 325 967
12-Aug
1 170 944
5 263 369
1 192 171
6 339 564
1 021 386
5 867 335
1 015 055
5 074 488
1 066 806
4 991 510
1 108 629
4 047 325
1 088 300
4 414 267
19-Aug
1 116 192
6 379 561
1 132 485
7 472 064
1 056 380
6 923 714
1 016 690
6 091 179
1 091 377
6 082 274
1 106 895
5 154 221
1 108 317
5 522 584
26-Aug
1 075 915
7 455 500
1 122 439
8 594 503
1 034 983
7 958 697
1 006 748
7 097 926
1 088 708
7 164 708
1 060 795
6 215 016
1 073 161
6 595 745
2-Sep
1 058 897
8 514 419
1 110 616
9 705 119
1 083 455
9 042 166
920 144
8 018 089
1 050 642
8 214 846
1 066 536
7 281 552
1 049 516
7 645 261
9-Sep
1 054 684
9 569 155
1 122 282
10 827 430
1 089 314
10 131 314
902 046
8 920 141
1 045 457
9 260 303
1 051 587
8 333 140
1 070 823
8 716 084
16-Sep
997 332
10 566 487
1 044 457
11 871 877
1 039 710
11 171 184
860 511
9 780 678
975 964
10 236 267
1 013 134
9 346 248
1 025 139
9 741 223
23-Sep
904 116
11 470 604
972 770
12 844 646
912 924
12 084 108
838 108
10 618 786
963 448
11 199 715
1 031 951
10 378 390
1 012 226
10 753 449
30-Sep
706 152
12 176 777
727 106
13 571 752
806 506
12 890 614
773 281
11 392 067
801 102
12 000 861
586 838
10 965 187
826 441
11 579 890
7-Oct
322 539
12 499 335
468 012
14 039 764
641 117
13 531 732
473 079
11 865 559
496 614
12 497 475
590 875
11 556 095
591 942
12 171 832
14-Oct
-
-
-
-
334 898
13 866 630
—-
—-
130 465
12 627 940
384 613
11 940 708
12 171 832
21-Oct
-
-
-
-
126 470
13 993 100
247 458
12 113 017
       
12 171 832
28-Oct
147 644
12 646 979
321 424
14 361 188
16 881
14 009 982
124 879
12 297 000

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board

PROJECTIONS for ORGANIC TOMATOES

 

WEEK 2017 2016 2015 2014
2013
ENDING    
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
WEEK
YTD*
UP TO                    
1-Jul     31 967 31 967 6 702 6 702 584 584 11 061 11 061
8-Jul
6 338
6 338
50 685 82 652 22 633 29 335 32 877 33 461 32 263 43 324
15-Jul
51 743
58 081
86 668 169 320 76 567 105 902 78 860 112 321 44 421 87 745
22-Jul
95 130 264 450 66 845 172 747 70 236 182 557 23 371 111 116
29-Jul
80 646 345 096 30 758 203 505 18 016 200 573 19 054 130 170
5-Aug
44 216 389 312 36 634 240 139 21 963 222 536 24 500 154 670
12-Aug
36 397 425 709 32 689 272 828 26 257 248 793 22 065 176 735
19-Aug
30 663 456 372 45 749 318 577 34 326 283 119 16 897 193 632
26-Aug
36 508 492 880 45 523 364 100 42 800 325 919 27 051 220 683
2-Sep
56 650 549 530 30 237 394 337 14 989 340 908 34 243 254 926
9-Sep
53 083 602 613 21 751 416 088 17 369 358 277 17 830 272 756
16-Sep
44 710 647 323 19 769 435 857 11 231 369 508 7 867 280 623
23-Sep
40 650 687 973 12 922 448 779 1 218 370 726 5 121 285 744
30-Sep
36 828 724 801 8 970 457 749     336 286 080
7-Oct
    5 225 462 974        
14-Oct
    6 657 469 631        
21-Oct
    233 469 864        
28-Oct
               

* Prior period adjustments are made in the "YTD" column and as a result the sum of the "Week" column may be different from the YTD Total.

TONS = short tons (0.907 metric tons)
YTD = year to date
Source : Processing Tomato Advisory Board